Category Archives: New York
New York Food Trucks Named Among Best in the Country

The Daily Meal food website released a list of the best food trucks in America on Friday, and five New York food trucks made the grade. From lobster to barbecue, the Daily Meal celebrated the best food vendors on wheels that the Big Apple has to offer.

The site ranked the Cinnamon Snail truck first among New York food trucks and the eighth best food truck in the country. Created by chef Adam Sobel and family, the Cinnamon Snail food truck features a menu full of vegan takes on popular dishes. From its famous Korean Barbecue Seitan to Bourbon Hazelnut Pancakes, the truck’s menu has been a hit with patrons both in New York and in New Jersey.

The distinctive blue and tan trucks of Luke’s Lobster have been trundling through New York since 2009. With their focus on sustainable seafood and penchant for slathering their delicious lobster rolls in vast quantities of butter, Luke’s Lobster has gained a loyal customer following over the years. The Daily Meal ranked the seafood restaurant on wheels 31st in the nation.

Taïm Mobile’s distinctive Middle Eastern cuisine has become a staple in New York City. Since 2005, husband and wife duo Stefan Nafziger and Einat Admony have been dishing out their tasty falafel to hungry diners. Their special roasted red pepper tahini helped them to earn a top spot on the Daily Meal’s list.

Although Korean-Mexican fusion started in Los Angeles, Edward Song’s Korilla BBQ food truck has captured taste buds in New York since 2010 with its tasty bulgogi burritos and pork tacos. The truck’s bacon kimchi fried rice and beef chosun bowl helped to snag the 78th spot on the list as one of the country’s best food trucks.

Uncle Gussy’s food truck earned the 94th spot on the list. The aqua blue truck can often be seen in Midtown dishing out grilled souvlaki and savory yellow rice to famished customers. Uncle Gussy’s also holds the distinction of being on Yelp’s list of the top five food trucks in New York City.

New Pho Eatery Opens in Brooklyn

The culinary trio made up of Kim Hoang, Tuan Biu and Dennis Ngo finally opened their new pho restaurant this week on Greenpoint Avenue in Brooklyn. Di An Di had one of the most hotly anticipated new openings in New York City this spring.

The team behind Di An Di is already well known for An Choi in the Lower East Side, opened in 2009. Dennis Ngo helmed the kitchen and Tuan Bui owns the eatery with his brother Huy. The restaurant became popular for offering Manhattan diners a mid-level indoor space to enjoy banh mi and pho. Together with Tuan and his wife Kim Hiang, Ngo announced in November 2017 that they were opening a new pho restaurant in Brooklyn.

After much anticipation in the foodie community, Di An Di launched this week in the space formerly occupied by the Hail Mary diner. With its airy, well-lit green and white interior, the restaurant presents a soothing atmosphere for diners to enjoy their pho in peace. The fresh taste of the steaming pho is complemented by the space’s abundant greenery and natural wooden furniture.

The menu features five different kinds of pho, including Southern Vietnam-style pho bò, a type of beef pho. Chef Dennis Ngo also cooks up a vegetarian version of his spicy lemongrass noodle soup and a vegan variety of his turmeric món cuốn, a type of Vietnamese roll. The menu also includes other traditional dishes like fried pig tails, as well as a selection of cocktails, beer and wine.

While the venue is hosting private events for patrons, it not yet open to the public. According to the owners, Di An Di is experimenting with a soft open this week and will be fully open to the public next week, although its hours have not yet been finalized.

The Best Places to Find Mole Poblano in New York

Mexican dishes in New York that have either enchilladas or chicken as the central aspect of the meal have a sauce on them that’s become known in the city as mole poblano. This convergence of countless ingredients gets roasted and then simmered, a process that multiplies the flavor considerations.

 

The poblano portion of the name is based on the belief that this concept originated in Puebla, a state in Mexico. The exotic blend of aforementioned ingredients includes such strange bedfellows as chocolate and onion. However, tomato and chilies are usually tossed in to give it that sense of Mexico.

 

In the area, Long Island City’s Casa Enrique, their attempt at mole uses things like raisins and sesame seeds. It also goes beyond simply focusing on that Mexican state of Puebla and drilling down further to a community known as Piaxtla. What the diner gets is more sweet than might otherwise be expected.

 

On Willis Avenue, those in La Morada have the opportunity to go even farther wehen it comes to choices. That’s because six different considerations are available, represented by colors like green and black. The green, or verde, combines herbs and jalapenos, while the black, or negro, has at its core a chile that’s darker in texture.

 

Two Sunset Park places that prominently feature tacos on their menu don’t shy away from offering their own take of mole poblano, esch going in different directions. Tacos El Bronco’s dish is more tart and definitely brings the heat, while Tacos Matamoros is definitely in the sweet vein with cinnamon and chocolate notable additions to this version of poblano.

 

Given the melting pot that is New York, it’s inevitable that a further breakdown of cultural cuisine has become a necessity for restaurants to make their mark, with mole poblano the latest addition.

 

A Startup Replaces a Legend

New York City is known for a lot of different things. The statue of liberty, Time Square, and Broadway are all located in the city that never sleeps. However, New York’s amazing food scene draws thousands of tourists from near and far. The Big Apple’s food scene is about to undergo a significant change, because a well-known chef will no longer have a restaurant there.

See More Seafood

Anyone who is familiar with fine cuisine is certainly familiar with the hit television show Iron Chef. Therefore, it might come as a surprise that one of the regulars on the show is closing a restaurant in New York. Jose Garces is one of the greatest chefs in the US, but his Battery Park City restaurant will be closing later this month.

Amanda is a Spanish restaurant with a regular clientele. However, it will soon be replaced by the growing Seafood chain Seamore’s. The founder of the growing chain (Michael Chernow) has vowed to keep the same layout that’s featured in Amanda. Michael Chernow is a charismatic individual who has been feature in the pages of GQ Magazine. He seems anxious about the opening of his fifth restaurant. He has promised to add another bar to the restaurant which is locate at 250 Vesey Street.

The citizen of Tribeca will be treated to an environmentally friendly type of original cuisine. They serve “sustainable local catch” and they’re set to open in July. People who enjoy Spanish food might not be pleased, but fans of fresh seafood are already rejoicing.

David Chang Announces Restaurant Reshuffle

Celebrity chef David Chang is revamping his restaurant empire. The Ugly Delicious star has opted to close his Midtown Manhattan eatery Má Pêche in preparation for the June launch of his lavish new Momofuku Noodle Bar in the Time Warner Center.

Founded in 2010 in the basement of the Chambers Hotel, Má Pêche was originally a collaboration between Chang and Vietnamese chef Tien Ho. The restaurant became known for its Vietnam-inspired French cuisine, serving everything from squid salad seasoned with chile peppers to traditional French escargots de Bourgogne. In 2011, Ho left Má Pêche to open Montmatre in the heart of Chelsea.

After Ho’s departure, the restaurant underwent a sea change when Chef Paul Carmichael retooled the menu to focus on dim sum carts and fried chicken. Carmichael’s efforts met with success when the eatery became a top destination for diners grabbing a bite to eat before seeing a show. He kept the menu fresh by offering a special 10-course tasting menu to patrons and calling them personally beforehand to carefully craft the perfect dishes. After a successful run, Carmichael was tapped to helm Momofuku Seiobo in Sydney, Australia and was replaced by chef de cuisine Heather Machovec in 2015.

Chang announced on Friday that he has decided to shutter Má Pêche. After increased security measures at nearby Trump Tower were implemented in 2016, the restaurant has struggled to attract patrons. Most of the staff of Má Pêche will transition to Chang’s new branch of Momofuku Noodle Bar, due to open on the third floor of the Time Warner Center in June. Chang also plans to open a new noodle eatery next year on the fifth floor of The Shops at Hudson Yards. With this new establishment, Chang intends to recreate the feel of his Toronto-based venture, Daishō.

The Godfather of Pizza by the Slice Opens Up Yorkville Place

The making of pizza has different nuances attached to it, yet it’s usually not something that establishments focus on when it comes to offering innovative approaches that they feel diners might embrace. However, creating al taglio pizza is something that connects with New York audiences, since the direct translation is pizza by the slice. That’s why the concept’s creator has opened up a place at 1631 Second Avenue in Yorkville.

That man’s name is Rome-based Angelo Iezzi, who has teamed with Fabio Casella, the owner of San Matteo, to open PQR. That acronym stands for Pizza Quadrata Romana, which began serving its pies on March 15. The difference with al taglio is that instead of the traditional round shape, rectangular pizzas are the norm.

The idea has been around for the last three decades, though it was controversial when it was first offered. That’s because the local health department wasn’t happy with the idea of 80 percent hydration of the dough mixing with cold fermentation for a total of four days. Yet the taste delivered actually makes it a much more digestible food, which may be because of the additional olive oil that’s also part of the recipe.

Stopping in offers hungry customers anywhere from eight to 12 different pizzas, including some exotic choices that go far beyond a pepperoni and sausage. Instead, palates get a chance to sample pies that combine goats-milk cheese, prosciutto and grapes. If that doesn’t whet their appetite, dough stuffed with porchetta and with a potato-based crust might be the selection.

Not every aspect of al taglio is the same as in Rome, with PQR selling their pizza by the American-friendly concept of by the slice. Italians are used to purchasing theirs by the weight, an idea that would likely raise eyebrows in New York.

Hwa Yuan Szechuan in Lower Manhattan

Hwa Yuan Szechuan is a Chinese restaurant in Lower Manhattan. It was built by James Tang and Chien Lieh Tang, the grandson and son of Shorty, a man who owned a famous restaurant before them. Shorty, whose real name was Yu Fa Teng, owned a restaurant that was also called Hwa Yuan Szechuan Inn. His grandson and son named their business after his business in order revive the family business in the 21st century.

A person who visits this place for the first time should try the cold sesame noodles. Do not let the word “cold” discourage you—the coldness of the noodles refers to a freshness and crispness that makes them all the more delicious.

The food at Hwa Yaun Szechuan is not overbearing. Of course, they do use peppers, but in moderation. They do not add tons of lard in the food, as well.

There are some things that their kitchen seems to always be out of, including Hwa Yuan crab cakes, foie gras with fruit and duck liver pate.

Most of their food is pretty good, though there are a few things that aren’t great. For example, the dry-aged shell steak is unpleasantly tough.

There is a tasty dish where potatoes are cooked with chilies and peanuts–kung pao style.

If you are not in the mood to consume cold noodles, Whole Fish With Hot Bean Sauce is a great dish to eat. At the original restaurant, a lot of people ordered this meal. It was produced with carp.

They sell whole, roasted ducks for $65.00. A critic for The New York Times claimed that it was not worth it. He was not satisfied with the cutting of the meat, as well as the conditions of the skin. He claimed that the meat tasted good, though.

Danny Meyer Receives 2018 Workplace Legacy Award

In October 2015, Danny Meyer who operates Union Square Hospitality Group started instituting a no-tipping policy at his 13 restaurants. Recently, he admitted that approximately 35 percent of his front-of-the-house staff left over his decision. Meanwhile, Meyer says that most of the back-of-the-house staff are making up to 20 percent more. He says that the front-end replacement staff are glad of the no-tipping policy because they think giving great service is part of their job. Danny was recently given the 2018 Workplace Legacy Award for his commitment to his employees.

In accepting the reward, Meyer had many interesting things to say about the food industry. He applauds the industry where almost anyone with a great work ethic and a desire to succeed can get a job. Meyer said he eliminated tipping because he found that the practice was extremely unfair because front-of-the-house workers often made up to 300 percent more than those behind the scenes.

Meyer says that he believes deeply in servant leadership. He compares retaining good employees to using the best ingredients to make a dish. Furthermore, he says that those employees should be equipped to go where they are told to go because they are all part of one big team.

Finally, Meyer says that the hospitality industry is poised to become one of the most important in the world for discussions that make a difference. He says that it is easier to have tough discussions about things like sexual harassment and discrimination when food is present because most people will not yell with a great plate of food in their hand.

While many will disagree with Meyer’s viewpoint, there is no doubt that he has built a successful empire based on his beliefs.

Karakatta Goes After the Discerning Ramen Diner

New York City is a haven for restaurants that cater to select audiences that are expecting expertise in a particular culinary delight. That tradition is continuing with Karakatta, which is designed to appeal to audiences that are craving spicy ramen to fill them up, with that dish the entire focus of the establishment.

Ramen by itself has long been connected to economically-challenged college students just trying to get a filling meal. In the case of Karakatta, the goal takes on a broader approach, with unique touches that allow for a more sumptuous opportunity to embrace all that this often-derided food item has to offer.

Located just south of Washington South Park, Karakatta was designed to offer up a small footprint without being cramped when it comes to diner comfort. The result has thus far been welcoming, largely because of the tempting dishes that are offered. In addition, karaage is one of the main focal points when it comes to appetizers, with sauces such as ponzu-sesame and curry there to put some bite into the meal.

Yet like any restaurant, Karakatta will live and die based on its main dishes, one of which is spicy vegetable curry. Among the items in this dish are scallions, tofu and shredded red pepper. Others may be more comfortable choosing the butter miso, which helps mix together items like ground pork and pork belly with a dash of cilantro. Miso also finds its way into either the teriyaki chicken or pork belly, though this comes in the form of soup. Also along for the ride with the teriyaki is are Japanese pickles.

Of course, the chicken and pork belly are versatile enough to also be used in the Karakatta version of shoyu. Here, key components like cabbage, bean sprouts and leeks offer a new twist.

Jeremy Goldstein – NYC Business Legal Adviser

There are various factors that affect the economical sustainability of many organizations on a global scale. Addressing these issues have never been an easy task even up until this point in time. Fostering a sustainable economic environment takes an invaluable amount of strategic planning and effort. This situation has without a doubt left many companies battling; putting them on the losing side of the business game. Having worked with some of the most prestigious and established corporations such as Bank of America among others, the highly sought for legal business and financial council – attorney at law Jeremy Goldstein, offers insight on how to effectively approach and handle Earnings Per Share as well as other incentive based programs.

 

When it comes to stocks and other aspects of the financial arena, ESP plays a major role in the variations of stock price, which serves also as a magnet that pulls shareholders to buy and/or sell stocks. This kind of metrics allow for greater incentives and payouts towards employees, which in turn contributes to employee satisfaction and company success.

 

Irrespective of the benefits of ESP implemented in a business, it can also produce many negative results of a company/business. The competitive nature of shares and trading is very attractive, but it can sometimes be misleading and offensive to other external entities. These types of metrics are considered to be beneficial for investments on a short term probability, but provide no guarantee for long term sustainability of a company. Once a companies focus is not entirely centered on short term goals for sustainable development, they can find creative and effective ways to structurize and strengthen the perceived value of shares.

 

Jeremy Goldstein

 

Jeremy is an attorney at law who has been practicing for several years within the domain of monetary legalities and the legislation that governs such; providing valuable information to companies of how to effectively handle factors that go into sustainable economic environments for development and growth of companies. Before venturing on his own into Jeremy L. Goldstein & Associates, he had practice for several years in New York City. He is one of the most recognized legal advisers to many Fortune 500 companies in the United States of America. He is also the author of many journals that address the legal and financial matters of business. Among that, he is also a partner/member of the American Bar Association and is also a part o the advisory board of the NYU Journal of Law Business. Learn more:  https://nycinquirer.com/2018/01/15/nyc-lawyer-jeremy-goldstein-recommends-compromise-for-employment-incentives/

 

Jeremy was also an active partner of Wachtell, Lipton and Rosen & Katz for 14 years. During his tenure, he was responsible for participating in the firm’s compensation practice; addressing issues with this sphere with respect to corporate governance. Currently he is now practicing in his own firm, which he started in 2014, and is still running. He will continue to impact the lives of many people and companies.

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