Category Archives: NYC Restaurants
Kubeh Ready to Tempt Those Middle Eastern Taste Buds

With the wide array of New York restaurants available, seemingly every international taste has been accounted for when it comes to dining options. However, Greenwich Village will now have a place that’s specifically focused on serving kubeh, the dumpling that continues to tantalize discriminating palates around the world.

 

The new restaurant, known simply as Kubeh, will be run by Long Island native Melanie Shurka and is located near 11th Street at 464 Sixth Avenue. It will serve the dumplings that are filled with bulgur wheat and semolina, with enhancements to flavor coming through the broth in which it’s served.

 

Shurka is looking to widen the dining options, which is why those getting a bite to eat will have five different forms kubeh and four different broths. This is a staple of the Middle East region of Levantine, which connects the nations of Jordan and Syria with Palestine.

 

A sampling of those possible options whet the appetites for those who enjoy exotic foods. Kubeh-based items like Kurdish siske in chicken broth or Syrian Codfish in a tomato, arak and fennel soup can be enjoyed with side dishes like haricot-vert salad that includes items like yogurt and dukkah or fried kibbeh with dill and sweet pea.

 

In the area of broths, some of those options include hamusta, which combines zucchini, lemon and Swiss chard or selek, which merges celery, herbs and beets.

 

Straying only slightly from the main dish, diners will also have the opportunity to try the kibbeh, which is similar in nature to kubeh. In this case, these tasty items are deep-fried concoctions that offer some added bite. If those aren’t to the liking of that diner, there’s always something like tahdiq or a bowl of sabich, the latter of which happens to be a favorite of Jews in Iraq.

Former Knicks’ Player John Starks on His Favorite New York City Restaurants

Former New York Knick’s star John Starks is still a fan favorite. He played from 1990 to 1998 for the team racking up 10,829 points. He now spends many of his days raising funds for many worthwhile causes. Recently, he gave Grub Magazine an interview about some of his favorite New York City restaurants.

 

John likes to eat at the J House Café in Greenwich Village where he frequently has the black-bean soup for an appetizer followed by the grilled snapper for the main course. This eatery features American cuisine that is all prepared in full sight of its high-end customers.

 

MishMosh in is a favorite delicatessen of John’s where he frequently orders the grilled chicken, tomato, and lettuce sandwich. He is particularly fond of their Naked protein juice smoothie.

 

John also likes to eat the brunch at the Club Bar & Grill inside Madison Square Gardens. When dining at this establishment, he likes to have the French toast, smoked salmon, crab cakes and a glass of orange juice. This restaurant opens two hours before every Knicks and Rangers game and stays open at least one hour after the game is over giving everyone a chance to watch the game while enjoying fabulous food.

 

John also likes to dine at Café 31 Sports Bar & Grill when watching the action at Madison Square Gardens. When dining here, he likes to eat the vegetarian minestrone with pasta and vegetables and enjoys the large Greek salad with shrimp. He says that when he eats at other restaurants his order often varies, but that is almost always the same thing at this restaurant that he eats at frequently.

Transformation of New York City Food and Restaurant Scene Over the Past Twenty Years

In the past 20 years, the food and restaurant scene has transformed in New York City. The younger generation is becoming more health conscience and selecting quality restaurants with top chefs. Young people are becoming restaurant business owners curing meats, rotting items in the cellar, and creating their sausages. Customers are more interested in the expertise of chefs without selecting a particular item from the menu. When Business Insider interviewed TV personality and executive chef of Brasserie Les Halles, Antony Bourdain, he explained the changes in the NYC food and restaurant scene he observed throughout the years.

 

 

Mr. Bourdain told Business Insider that he noticed a majority of customers were concerned about the chefs and cooks who were preparing their foods in the restaurant industry, today. As he reminisces the 1990’s, the culture of famous chefs was prevalent, but different from the present. One of the most significant changes was people the ages of 18 to 35 spending their money dining at quality restaurants rather than purchasing designer purses, based on a study by Eventbrite. With the scare of processed foods on the rise nationally, NYC restaurants are catering to these people to ensure their menu items contain fresh ingredients.

 

 

It has caused a negative impact on certain restaurants to the point of consumers questioning the quality of foods, including meats, grains and vegetables. They want to know the name of farmers and what they were feeding their livestock. Although some customers aren’t concerned with the information, Mr. Bourdain is grateful that people are becoming health conscience. Restaurants are educating their staff more than ever about the quality of ingredients in main course meals. If a customer questions the ingredients, the waiters are knowledgeable of the quality of every menu item.

 

 

The transformation of restaurants is not only in New York City, but in other parts of the country. Antony Bourdain is ecstatic about what the young people have created in Manhattan and surrounding areas. Restaurants may have had a small price to pay in the transformation process, but it has attracted more young people than ever before. It’s a magnificent thing for the customers, restaurant establishments, chefs, and the younger generation contributing to creating different tasteful foods.

 

Making the Most of Your Brunch in New York City

The very nature of eating brunch means sitting back and relaxing because the available food encompasses two specific meals. Restaurants understand the concept, with many making the appropriate accommodations to make sure that everything is just right. A number of different places do it better than anyone else in the New York area, which means that knowing where to go can make life so much simpler.

 

One of the best places to enjoy such relaxation might be Upland at 345 Park Avenue South, with food that some might consider basic. However, those that taste things like spinach-infused omelettes with Bulgarian feta or Cloumage cheese on top of pizza would likely beg to differ with such an assessment.

 

More hectic surroundings can be found at Prune on E. 1st Street, which opened nearly two decades ago. There’s not much room to go around, with roughly 20 or so tables fitting into the surroundings. Yet despite such coziness, the staff remains attentive to orders like Monte Cristo sandwiches, blueberries on top of Dutch pancakes and any number of potential Bloody Mary options.

 

In the Williamsburg area, Sunday in Brooklyn could operate just as well on any other day. That helps explain why crowds flock there, drawn by such concoctions as an innovative take on the standard sausage, egg and cheese sandwich. Here, that sausage has just a hint of maple syrup and sage, while things like malted pancakes also find a way to garner attention.

 

International bruch options can be found in places like Paowalla, which focuses on Indian dishes like Egg Kejirwal from its Spring Street location. Not to be outdone, the Australian-based Two Hands Restaurant & Bar in the Tribeca area on Church Street offers items like Brassicas and ricotta pancakes to hungry diners looking for a unique experience.

Empellon Comes to Midtown

Finding Mexican food in Midtown isn’t necessarily a tough task, though finding a place that’s put so much thought into the entire concept may be difficult to find. That belief may start shifting now that Empellon has found its way to this area, the latest evolution in chef Alex Stupak’s rise in the New York restaurant community.

 

Stupak is, by training, a pastry chef, yet the wonders that he’s created since the first incarnation of Empellon came to the West Village in 2011 have seemingly zeroed in on his capabilities when it comes to Mexican cuisine. The standard corn tortilla and taco hardly resonate with more refined palates, but when that tortilla is filled with pastrami and short ribs, the focus sharpens.

 

This newest version of Empellon, located at 510 Madison Avenue, expands the notion of just opening up a standard restaurant and letting people flock in to enjoy the food. Instead, Stupak has created a glossier impression by having two levels of eating areas and a room to hold any sort of party or celebration.

 

Such visual delights and the upscale food involved means that prices aren’t of the mom-and-pop variety. Of course, your friendly neighborhood taco shop won’t offer a Japanese Wagyu-infused fajita that will cost $125 or house tacos that set you back $30. Tamales with shredded duck inside and gourmet tacos, the latter of which has nine menu items, offer a clear message that this is anything but traditional Mexican food.

 

If that food isn’t filling enough Empellon also has desserts to tempt those whose sweet tooth can never be satisfied. Avocado parfait is one of the more exotic, yet the available drinking options may be seen as more tempting to those that want to sit back and relax.

 

 

“Breaking Bad” Pop-Up Bar Coming to NYC

Even though the show ended four years ago, people are still obsessed with AMC’s hit “Breaking Bad.” In case you’ve been living under a rock, the show follows Walter White, a chemistry teacher turned meth lord and his lab partner Jesse. Now NYC customer can drink their cares away in a “Breaking Bad” themed pop-up bar this summer. The bar, which has been serving Londoners for the past two years, has finally made its way stateside.

 

Conceived by UK-based company Lollipop, ABQ is a mobile cocktail bar set in a replica of Walter White’s RV meth lab. Groups of 30 guests can enter at a time and will be served clever concoctions that incorporate molecular mixology techniques like nitrogen cavitation. Other touches from the show include bartenders dressed in protective yellow jumpsuits and White’s alias “Heisenberg” written on a wall.

 

Though the exact location of the pop-up has not been decided on yet, several locations across Brooklyn are being considered. ABQ will open sometime in July and operate for a few months after. Over 1500 people have already secured their tickets for the experience, which cost $45 for three cocktails and two hours spent in the bar. Lollipop, the company behind the bar, is known for its over-the-top dining ideas including one restaurant where both staff and diners were nude.

 

Can’t wait until summer to get your “Breaking Bad” fix? Check out Walter’s Coffee Roastery in Bushwick. This cafe features more subtle nods to the show like a menu laid out like the periodic table, coffee served in laboratory beakers, and hints of HazMat suit yellow everywhere.

 

The Best NYC Dine-In Movie Theaters

In a recent article, Grubstreet listed the best places to go for dinner and a movie. Dine-in movie theaters are becoming more and more popular as a one-stop date destination. It’s the same entertainment factor as the old-timey dinner and a show but with today’s newest blockbusters.

 

Their number one pick is Brooklyn’s Nitehawk Cinema. Nitehawk is actually the theater responsible for overturning the New York law against alcohol in movie theaters and remains one of the country’s best destinations. Unlike many dine-in theaters that feature the same old menu at every showing, Nitehawk coordinates their food and drink selections to the film. They also offer seasonal non-themed food items including tacos and charcuterie boards as well as brunch and dessert selections.

 

For those on a budget, GrubStreet recommends Syndicated in Bushwick. To cut costs, this theater shows movies that aren’t first-run including everything from old Hollywood classics to months-old blockbusters. Serving up unique versions of movie snacks like loaded tater tots, bacon-topped nachos, and five flavors of popcorn, this place feels a bit cooler than a night out at a chain movie theater. Wash it down with a spiked milkshake or a movie-themed cocktail. They only have one 60-seat theater, though, so order your tickets ahead of time!

 

Want a less hipster dine-in experience? Check out iPic in the South Street Seaport. This is the coziest way to watch a movie with your boo since the living room couch. Kick back on a chaise longue or recliner or go all-out and reserve a cozy pod for two. For $60 you and your partner can cuddle up with a blanket, pillow, and table service as you enjoy swanky selections like filet mignon sliders and ratatouille pizza.

 

Hot Pot Favorites for NYC Diners

Coming together for a meal is something that’s at the heart of the idea of eating hot pot. The Asian favorite offers the combination of meat, mushroom and other considerations with a dizzying array of other options for dipping purposes. Given the melting pot that is New York City, it seems obvious that a number of places around this vast city know how to do it right in this particular area,

 

One of those is Little Sheep Mongolian Hot Pot, located near Hester Street. This brand actually has a chain of restaurants in China, yet there’s much more than assembly line methods that mirror McDonald’s. Instead, you have your choice of spicy, mild or sour pickled-cabbage broth, which can be used for the garlic beef, lamb shoulder or beef meatballs that make up the menu.

 

Right on Hester Street, as well as Second Avenue is Hou Yi Hot Pot, which likely offers one of the best values around. That’s because it’s essentially all-you-can-eat, with plenty of broths that have concepts like a Vietnamese taste to them as well as the non-Asian country of Italy’s own version.

 

On 37th Avenue sits Lao Cheng Yi Guo, which has some of the finest beef in this segment of the restaurant business. More creative ideas like egg-crepe dumplings and fried clay-oven rolls are options along with more traditional concerns like Sichuan peppercorn.

 

Variety is considered the spice of life and at one of its two restaurants, Little Lamb Mongolian Hot Pot BBQ, diners can choose between five broths and three types of sauces that can be further broken down by whether you prefer red or white. That’s microscopic compared to the 100-plus different cooking options. Those two establishments are located near 53rd Street along with one in Flushing.

 

 

Emily Set to Open in West Village on June 7

Having made quite an impact in the Clinton Hill area of rooklyn with their assortment of pizza, sandwiches and burgers, the owners of the place known simply as Emily are headed to Manhattan. When they open up their establishment at 35 Downing Street on June 7, Emily and Matt Hyland will look to garner the same level of popularity as its first two restaurants.

 

Moving into what used to be the Blue Ribbon Bakery, Emily will fully exploit the availability of an in-store oven that’s roughly 150 years old. Despite that ancient status, it’s still in fine working order and is expected to crank out the signature pizzas that the original and its sequel, Emily Squared, have been producing over the course of the last three years.

 

That oven is 14 by 18 feet and will play a key role in the wood-fired cooking process, which has offered diners 13 different options when it came to pizza. Whether white or red is your favorite color of pizza, Emily has the capability to handle both. For those who really want to fill up, the RM3 brings together sausage, pepperoni and prosciutto, while The Q overwhelms you with Pecorino, Fontina, ricotta and mozzarella.

 

Yet to simply call Emily a pizza place is undercutting just how popular and delicious the burgers and sandwich options are to the customers who crowd the restaurant. In addition, things like pig ears are adorned with winter greens, while diners can choose either frizzled or fried Brussels sprouts that are mixed with things like chili and green apple dicings, with Worcestershire sauce prominent in the taste.

 

While no final decision has yet to be made, the belief by many is that the West Village restaurant will introduce curly fries to the menu, which remains a work-in-progress.

Movie Buffs Sitting Down to Dine While They Watch

Going out for a meal either before or after a movie has been standard practice for ages all across the world. The idea of eating dinner DURING the movie is something that was once ridiculed on Seinfeld, giving a hint to how such an idea was perceived just a generation ago.

 

However, the concept has become much more mainstream, with a number of New York City movie theaters offers cinema fans the chance to eat more than warmed-over popcorn and hot dogs that have been re-cooked more than a few times. Prior to 2011, a New York state law barred serving alcohol in any movie theatres.

 

That changed due to the originator of this idea, Nitehawk, which offers a number of exotic items on its menu that are sometimes thematically in tune with the film being shown. Yet there are other standard offerings like Turkish lamb sliders, truffle popcorn and Korean chicken tacos.

 

Other places like Metrograph attempt to recall film studio commissaries, though their main offerings run the gamut from chicken fra diavolo to steak tartare. At iPic, the pricy Premium Plus seats allow a couple to enjoy a film and receive table service while sitting in push-button recliners, with a blanket and pillow also available. Not surprisingly, the cost per couple is $60.

 

At the Alamo Drafthouse Cinema, cushy armchairs are also available for what resembles more of a bar. Snacks, slong with salads and sandwiches are available, or those with a sweet tooth can take advantage of the 16 different floats and shakes available.

 

Some of that latter group may have some alcohol in them, though cinema buffs can also choose from plenty of different wines, cocktails or any of the different beers that now total more than three dozen. At Syndicated, snacks and booze are plentiful.

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