Dr. Saad Saad Advices Parents How to Keep Their Kids Safe

According to the article in the Medical Daily Times, Dr. Saad Saad is a highly skilled pediatric surgeon with four decades of experience in removing objects from patients’ food pipe (esophagus) and the windpipe (trachea). During Dr. Saad’s career, he helped more than 1,000 kids, aged between 6 months and 14 years old, get food and other objects that were stuck in the trachea and esophagus. He invented an improvement for optical devices called endoscopes to aid him together with other doctors perform this procedure better.

 

Dr. Saad stated that batteries are known to be the most dangerous foreign objects that can stick in the food pipe when swallowed by any kid. Since they’re relatively small, a kid can easily pick and swallow them. Furthermore, in addition to normal AAA or AA batteries, there are much smaller batteries that are even easier to swallow. This includes circular batteries in calculators, cameras, watches, and other small electronics at home. When its swallowed, a battery can end up leaking the acid inside it, which can cause severe injuries and serious burn to a kid’s stomach or esophagus. That’s why it’s essential to always keep a careful watch whenever a kid is playing with cameras, TV remote, electronic toys, or any electronic device running on battery power.

 

Also, peanuts are dangerous objects to swallow, particularly for a small kid. Since peanuts are small, they’re more likely end up getting stuck in the kid’s trachea than the esophagus. When they are stuck in the trachea, the liquid that’s in your kid’s lungs can end up making them soft and make them expand, which can cause further blockage. Moreover, Dr. Saad described that it’s hard for doctors to remove a peanut from the trachea|; using tweezers to grasp the peanut can fragment it, allowing the crumbles to spread further through the lungs.

 

Consequently, Dr. Saad suggests that parents should follow children to avoid getting any foreign object stuck in their windpipe or food pipe. First, do not allow children under 2 years old to take hot dogs. If not chewed properly, they can completely block the trachea. Second, do not allow children under the age of 7 to have peanuts; they can be very dangerous when stuck in the trachea.

 

Third, you should watch children carefully when they are plying to make sure they don’t put anything they should not in their mouth. Since that can be difficult to do, you should be aware of your kids surrounding. Additionally, watch out for siblings who might put things in their brother’s or sister’s mouth. Dr. Saad was born in Palestine, but he was raised in Kuwait. He went to Cairo University and received his medical degree with honors; he was also ranked second in his entire class. He also has two master’s degrees and two Ph.D. Learn more : https://about.me/ssaad/getstarted

 

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